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You are hereHomeBhutan › History

History


History Of Bhutan

 

 Till well into the 17th Century, Bhutan was split up into small independent principalities. After the arrival of Buddhism, during the seventh century, the various Buddhist schools began sharing the power in the country with the old aristocratic families.

 

The cleric Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyel united the independent principalities into one state. After his death the theocracy disintegrated and the provincial lords fought to gain control over the central power. Only the establishment of the monarchy in 1907 brought peace again. Today the fourth King of Bhutan is leading his country into modern times.

 

  Geography Of Bhutan

 

Bhutan is a landlocked country. It is about 47,000 kilometres - roughly the size of Switzerland. It is located between Tibet in the north, Indian states of West Bengal and Assam in the south, and Arunachal Pradesh in the east.

 

Bhutan has three major land regions. The Great Himalayan region in the north rises more than 4300 m (14,000 ft) along the Tibetan border. This area is uninhabited except for a few scattered settlements in the high valleys. The Great Himalayas radiate southward into central Bhutan, creating the Middle Himalayan zone.

 

  Flora & Fauna Of Bhutan

 

Bhutan enjoys four seasons each having its advantages and disadvantages to the visitor. The southern plains close to the Indian border are warmer and more tropical than higher central valleys. Spring is perhaps the most beautiful time of the year when the fierce cold that characterizes the winter months tends to subside towards the end of February with beautiful Rhododendron blooming with spectacular flaming red, pink and white colors. Summer months in the southern region are generally hot whereas in other parts of the country it is warm and pleasant with average maximum temperatures not exceeding 30 degrees Celsius and the minimum at around 10-15 degrees Celsius. The annual monsoon from the Bay of Bengal is also experienced around the country between June and September.

 

The autumn months from September to November bring shorter days and cooler evenings. The days are crisp with clear skies. Views over the Himalayas are usually the best during September to March. Beginning December the weather takes on its winter coat where days remain crisp and the nights turn cold. The southern region however being much lower have a more temperate climate and considerably warmer winters.

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